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As the shortest night of the year settles over the campground at Chaco Canyon, sound echoes off the pictograph-laden canyon walls: the ping of rocks on tent stakes, excited voices, and of course someone has brought a Native flute and another camper a drum.

When Delores Paul was 12 years old in 1968, she travelled with 160 other Navajos to Bosque Redondo, New Mexico, to partake in the 100-year reenactment of the signing of the Treaty of 1868.

Code Talker pushes for language sculpture

In the 1930s, Angela Ashley, a Diné weaver from Burnt Water, Arizona, lost most of her sheep to the Bureau of Indian Affairs livestock reduction.

The smell of fry bread wafted from the chapter house as Alyson Shirley greeted the people of her community she calls family.

The Resilience Garden on the grounds of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is no ordinary garden. It’s a journey that takes you thousands of years back into the past.

Next year will be the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of 1868.

Man revives an art almost as old as humans

Though she will use it occasionally for accents, the Maidu part of jewelry maker Liz Wallace does not happily work with gold because of her ancestors’ horrific experiences during the Gold Rush when bounties of 25 cents were put on the heads of Native children and women.

Gardening summit planning meeting produces idea for tour