INFR Ladies’ Breakaway Champion: Faith Holyan shows she’s a natural at roping

LAS VEGAS, Nevada

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero Breakaway roper Faith Holyan smiles and watches the calf run away with her rope around its neck as her father, Ed Holyan, top left, raises his arms in celebration Saturday night at the Indian National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, Nevada. Holyan won the breakaway world title in impressive fashion with an 11.54 aggregate of four calves.

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero
Breakaway roper Faith Holyan smiles and watches the calf run away with her rope around its neck as her father, Ed Holyan, top left, raises his arms in celebration Saturday night at the Indian National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, Nevada. Holyan won the breakaway world title in impressive fashion with an 11.54 aggregate of four calves.

It was seven years ago that Faith Holyan, then a 9-year old, erupted onto the scene in her first qualification at the Indian National Finals Rodeo.

In more ways than one, Holyan has grown up in front of the INFR family. And considering she is just 16, there is plenty of blooming left to do.

She had spent much of her life as top-notch barrel racer but in recent years, she has developed into a pure roper.

During the weeklong event the Coyote Canyon, New Mexico cowgirl proved the latter as she captured her first ladies’ breakaway world title at the South Point Equestrian Center in Las Vegas. With that, she earned her second INFR world title as she won the ladies all-around crown in 2014.

“I can’t tell you how happy I am,” Holyan said. “It’s a huge confidence booster, more than anything, I have been very blessed this week. God has favored me and he has taken care of me.”

Afterward she thanked her mother Carol Jackson-Holyan, father Ed Holyan and younger brother Dean Holyan for helping her break down every draw.

“They go through a lot to get me ready,” she said.

With her third INFR qualification as a breakaway roper, Holyan said she had to work very hard to be the skillful roper that she is today.

“I had to make myself better in something that I wasn’t very good at before,” she said. “I didn’t start out as a breakaway roper so my dad taught me everything that I know.”


 To read the full article, pick up your copy of the Navajo Times at your nearest newsstand Thursday mornings!

  Find newsstand locations at this link.



Categories: Rodeo

About Author

Quentin Jodie

Quentin Jodie is the Sports Editor for the Navajo Times. He started working for the Navajo Times in February 2010 and was promoted to the Sports Editor position at the end of summer in 2012. Previously, he wrote for the Gallup Independent. Reach him at
qjodie@navajotimes.com