‘No place like it’

The Sibley bell, a canvas camping tent, is the newest accommodation at Shash Diné Eco Retreat. The Sibley bell is known to be a class of its own, connecting guests to the purity of nature. (Times photo – Krista Allen)

The Sibley bell, a canvas camping tent, is the newest accommodation at Shash Diné Eco Retreat. The Sibley bell is known to be a class of its own, connecting guests to the purity of nature. (Times photo – Krista Allen)

Bed & Breakfast offers visitors slice of Navajo life

Baya Meehan, the head proprietor of Shash Diné Eco Retreat – a Bed & Breakfast in Coppermine, Ariz. – poses near a chaha’oh, set amid a vegetable garden, on her family’s ranch. Meehan and her husband, Paul, are working to establish a brand and grow their business to accommodate guests year-round. (Times photo – Krista Allen)

Baya Meehan, the head proprietor of Shash Diné Eco Retreat – a Bed & Breakfast in Coppermine, Ariz. – poses near a chaha’oh, set amid a vegetable garden, on her family’s ranch. Meehan and her husband, Paul, are working to establish a brand and grow their business to accommodate guests year-round. (Times photo – Krista Allen)

COPPERMINE, Ariz.

Directoire-style bedside tables, English armchairs, floral wallpaper, and scones might come to mind when one thinks of bed-and-breakfasts, but what might be the only B&B on the Navajo Nation is “glamping” with traditional Diné amenities, homegrown food, and outstanding, 24-hour security.

Shash Diné Eco Retreat – the glamping B&B – is located 12 miles south of Page, just off U.S. Highway 89 at Baya Meehan’s family homestead, a working ranch where Meehan and her husband Paul raise Anglo-Nubian goats, chickens, and Navajo-Churro sheep, among other animals and livestock such as Great Pyrenees, Maremma Sheepdogs, and horses.

The Meehans started their B&B here about three years ago after residing for a while in Bisbee, Ariz., where Baya was a receptionist at a naturopathic doctor’s office and Paul co-owned a café.

“We had the idea … when we first came back here,” said Baya, who Paul said is head proprietor of their B&B. “As we were researching it, it was filling a need that was obvious here.”
The Meehans’ B&B has been quite lucrative since creating their business idea.

“There is no place like this around here,” Baya said. “We want to provide a respectful interaction with the Navajo culture. We’re not putting on shows or anything, it’s just a slice of life in Navajo land that we’re offering here.”

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Categories: Business

About Author

Krista Allen

Krista Allen is the Western Agency Bureau reporter for the Navajo Times. She covers the western half of the Navajo Nation, including Page, Tuba City, Kaibeto, Cameron, Tonalea and Shonto. She can be reached at kallen@navajotimes.com.