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Dozens of children from schools across the Navajo Nation were laughing last Thursday as paint splattered across tables and the floor as they all eagerly pitched in on what would become two four-foot-tall Lego-inspired figures.

Months of promoting, cajoling, and well, something bordering on pestering, paid off for Jerry Sanchez and Joe Armijo, two old high school chums whose dream was to get more Native Americans out to a high school reunion.

It took 20 years, but Black Mesa Chapter finally got its Head Start building.

Back-to-School Bash offers motivation for Tonalea-Red Lake youth

Two hours after public interviews of three candidates for the Ganado Unified School District Governing Board on Aug. 3, Allan Blacksheep got a call to tell him he was chosen to fill some big shoes.

Nonprofit makes sure kids have the right tools

147 students receive Chief Manuelito Scholarship

In a perfect world, school security wouldn’t have to do much besides direct traffic at basketball games and break up the occasional wrestling match, maybe intercept a bottle of vodka a prankster was planning on pouring into the punch at the school prom.

Only 3.2 percent of Navajos receive a graduate or professional degree, according to a 2010 U.S. Census report. Miranda Haskie, from Lukachukai, Arizona, is part of this percentage.

Parents at a public hearing at Casamero Lake Chapter House on June 20 called for a recall of the board of Borrego Pass School, Dibé Yazhi Ha’bitiin Ji’ Olta.