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On a nice sunny day, the Tséhootsooí Medical Center hosted the 2nd Annual Navajo Youth Culture Day Camp to get kids off their couches this summer.

A representative from the National Archives is expected to visit Window Rock next month and if everything goes well, the tribe should get final approval to display the last known original copy of the Treaty of 1868 in time for the 150th anniversary of its signing next year.

Children and parents got their hands sticky and covered in paint as they decorated replica Navajo shields made of cardboard during “Shielding Our Culture,” a summer youth cultural and art workshop held last Thursday at the Navajo Nation Museum.

As the shortest night of the year settles over the campground at Chaco Canyon, sound echoes off the pictograph-laden canyon walls: the ping of rocks on tent stakes, excited voices, and of course someone has brought a Native flute and another camper a drum.

When Delores Paul was 12 years old in 1968, she travelled with 160 other Navajos to Bosque Redondo, New Mexico, to partake in the 100-year reenactment of the signing of the Treaty of 1868.

Code Talker pushes for language sculpture

In the 1930s, Angela Ashley, a Diné weaver from Burnt Water, Arizona, lost most of her sheep to the Bureau of Indian Affairs livestock reduction.

The smell of fry bread wafted from the chapter house as Alyson Shirley greeted the people of her community she calls family.

The Resilience Garden on the grounds of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is no ordinary garden. It’s a journey that takes you thousands of years back into the past.

Next year will be the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of 1868.