List of infected grows; PPE supply dwindles

WINDOW ROCK

As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise on the Navajo Nation, the shortage of personal protection equipment is becoming more noticeable.

On Tuesday, 10 more Navajo citizens got the news that they had the coronavirus. That brings the number of infected to 39 people who reside on the Navajo Nation, bringing the total number of Arizonans to 326. Two Arizonans have died.

Across the country, hospitals were feeling the shortage of PPE. The Navajo Nation was no exception.

Monday night, the first shipment of surgical gowns, face shields, gloves, blankets and other medical supplies was received. The equipment will go to healthcare officials and first responders.

The tribe got help from Apache County Supervisor Alton Joe Shepherd who helped acquire the PPE from the Strategic National Stockpile.

The PPE, which Nez said would probably last a week, were going to be shipped out to the PL .638-funded hospitals, like Tse Hootsooi Medical Center in Fort Defiance; Sage Memorial Hospital in Ganado; and Tuba City Regional Health Care in Tuba City, Arizona.

With the new infections, Nez said he could not emphasize enough the importance of staying home.

“How does it go again?” Nez said. “Stay home, stay safe, save lives.”

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham told New Mexicans to “stay at home” during a press conference.

The order instructs people to stay home and only leave their homes if their lives, welfare and safety were in danger. They could still go for a run or walk their dogs, but in groups fewer than five people, Grisham said.

“Non-essential” businesses could face civil and criminal penalties if they violated the order, she added. People were encouraged to call the COVID-19 hotline at 1-833-551-0518, if they saw a violation being committed.

On the Navajo Nation, four people from McKinley County were added to the number of New Mexicans with coronavirus, which is currently 83.

President Donald Trump announced today he wanted the country to get back to work by Easter, which is over three weeks away.


About The Author

Donovan Quintero

"Dii, Diné bi Naaltsoos wolyéhíígíí, ninaaltsoos át'é. Nihi cheii dóó nihi másání ádaaní: Nihi Diné Bizaad bił ninhi't'eelyá áádóó t'áá háadida nihizaad nihił ch'aawóle'lágo. Nihi bee haz'áanii at'é, nihisin at'é, nihi hózhǫ́ǫ́jí at'é, nihi 'ach'ą́ą́h naagééh at'é. Dilkǫǫho saad bee yájíłti', k'ídahoneezláo saad bee yájíłti', ą́ą́ chánahgo saad bee yájíłti', diits'a'go saad bee yájíłti', nabik'íyájíłti' baa yájíłti', bich'į' yájíłti', hach'į' yándaałti', diné k'ehgo bik'izhdiitįįh. This is the belief I do my best to follow when I am writing Diné-related stories and photographing our events, games and news. Ahxéhee', shik'éí dóó shidine'é." - Donovan Quintero is an award-winning Diné journalist, who is based in Window Rock, Arizona. He can be contacted at dq@navajotimes.com.

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