Ganado students participate in Ganado Pee Wee Science fair

Ganado students participate in Ganado Pee Wee Science fair
A student at Ganado Elementary School looks at the “I Can’t Believe My Eyes” science project that talks about optical illusion during the Ganado Pee Wee Science Fair on Feb. 3. (Times photo — Shondiin Silversmith)

A student at Ganado Elementary School looks at the “I Can’t Believe My Eyes” science project that talks about optical illusion during the Ganado Pee Wee Science Fair on Feb. 3. (Times photo — Shondiin Silversmith)

GANADO

Two girls point at the bolt that sits at the bottom of cup filed with Coke a Cola. The project asked which soda product, Coke or Pepsi, would clean a bolt. The bolt soaking in the Coke came out cleaner. (Times photo — Shondiin Silversmith)

Two girls point at the bolt that sits at the bottom of cup filed with Coke a Cola. The project asked which soda product, Coke or Pepsi, would clean a bolt. The bolt soaking in the Coke came out cleaner. (Times photo — Shondiin Silversmith)

It’s never too early to learn about science.

That’s what the Ganado Pee Wee Science Fair taught students from grades kindergarten through fourth as they showcased their projects.

Ganado Elementary School was invaded with science as 54 students presented their projects during the fair.

For instance Fourth grader Kade Descheny, 9, submitted a biology project for the science fair that tests the dirt from Many Farms, Ariz. and Cornfields, Ariz. to determine which soil is better for growing.

Descheny’s project was called “To Grow or Not to Grow.”

“I like to grow stuff, especially corn,” Descheny said on why she chose to develop this type of science fair project.

A Ganado Elementary School student looks through the data collected by Kade Descheny for her “To Grow or Not To Grow” science fair project. (Times photo — Shondiin Silversmith)

A Ganado Elementary School student looks through the data collected by Kade Descheny for her “To Grow or Not To Grow” science fair project. (Times photo — Shondiin Silversmith)

The steps Deschey had to take were simple for her project. She said she had to clean and dry the dirt before putting them into separate flowerpots.

She then placed three inches on the bottom, planted 16 corn kernels and covered them with three more inches of dirt. Descheny said she enjoyed gathering the dirt and watching the corn grow for her project. She watered the project once a day with one cup of water.

“The Many Farms dirt grows faster than the Cornfields dirt,” she said adding that she’d like to test other areas on the Navajo Nation.

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