Family, supporters seek justice for Winslow shooting victim

Family, supporters seek justice for Winslow shooting victim
Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero Analese Burrola, 14, holds a candle during a candlelight vigil for Loreal Tsginine Saturday in Winslow.

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero
Analese Burrola, 14, holds a candle during a candlelight vigil for Loreal Tsginine Saturday in Winslow.

WINSLOW

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero David John, who says he raised Loreal Tsginine since she was 13, holds a photo of her over his head Saturday during a vigil in Winslow.

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero
David John, who says he raised Loreal Tsginine since she was 13, holds a photo of her over his head Saturday during a vigil in Winslow.

As family members remembered Loreal Juana Tsingine for her “big strong hugs,” Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye threatened to sue the City of Winslow during a candlelight vigil and rally on Saturday in Winslow.

In front of a barricaded area in front of the Winslow Police Department, more than 300 people stood to hear a number of speakers, some holding “Justice 4 Loreal” signs.

Austin Shipley, whose name was released a week after the shooting, was identified in a press release from the Arizona Department of Public Safety as the Winslow Police officer who shot and killed Tsingine on Easter Sunday.

Tsingine was suspected of shoplifting from a Winslow convenience store and allegedly threatened Shipley with scissors as he tried to arrest her.

Family members like Floranda Dempsey spoke about Tsingine at the vigil.

“She always liked to hug. I think most of us remember her big strong hugs and the love that she had,” Dempsey said. “She was always smiling. Always said ‘I love you and give you a big hug. You couldnt stay mad at her.”

Alta Barnell, who was a cousin sister of Tsingine, thanked supporters and reiterated that she, too, wanted justice for her.

Barnell said she didnt want to tell her four children about what happened to Tsingine and wanted to be strong for her family.

Begaye was in attendance and listened to Tsingines family and supporters speak about the Winslow Police Departments tactics and how the death could have been prevented.

When he was given the mic, Begaye said border town police need to honor and respect Navajo people.

“Im asking the police officers in Winslow, in Holbrook, in Farmington, in Gallup, to respect the Navajo Nation people that are out on the street,” Begaye said. “No matter what theyre doing, you can talk sense into them, you can communicate with them. You dont have to pull a gun on them.”

“And Im going to say to City of Winslow, we will sue you if you dont rectify this. The Navajo Nation, we will sue the City of Winslow, if you do not address the way it should be addressed,” Begaye added.

Dempsey later added that her niece had recently become a certified caregiver to help the elderly.


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About The Author

Donovan Quintero

"Dii, Diné bi Naaltsoos wolyéhíígíí, ninaaltsoos át'é. Nihi cheii dóó nihi másání ádaaní: Nihi Diné Bizaad bił ninhi't'eelyá áádóó t'áá háadida nihizaad nihił ch'aawóle'lágo. Nihi bee haz'áanii at'é, nihisin at'é, nihi hózhǫ́ǫ́jí at'é, nihi 'ach'ą́ą́h naagééh at'é. Dilkǫǫho saad bee yájíłti', k'ídahoneezláo saad bee yájíłti', ą́ą́ chánahgo saad bee yájíłti', diits'a'go saad bee yájíłti', nabik'íyájíłti' baa yájíłti', bich'į' yájíłti', hach'į' yándaałti', diné k'ehgo bik'izhdiitįįh. This is the belief I do my best to follow when I am writing Diné-related stories and photographing our events, games and news. Ahxéhee', shik'éí dóó shidine'é." - Donovan Quintero is an award-winning Diné journalist, who is based in Window Rock, Arizona. He can be contacted at dq@navajotimes.com.