‘Dibé, sheep’

Grandmother helps Miss Tiny Tot learn Diné traditions

Navajo Times | Ravonelle Yazzie
Destiny Lutsie, 4, stands still as her grandmother Sandra Robinson fixes her pin before the start of the baby contest at Ramah Navajo Fair and Rodeo on Friday.

RAMAH

This was little Destiny Lutsie’s first time competing in any type of pageant and – spoiler alert – she won first place in the four- to five-year-old category of the tiny tots’ pageant at the Ramah Navajo Fair and Rodeo.

Destiny’s grandmother, Sandra Robinson, had wanted her to learn to speak Navajo and more about her culture. “I want her to know her traditions,” Robinson said. “I wanted her to learn her Navajo, her clans.”

And Destiny is well on her way. “She understands when I talk to her in Navajo,” Robinson said.


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Categories: Culture

About Author

Pauly Denetclaw

Pauly Denetclaw is Meadow People born for Towering House People. She was raised in Manuelito and Naschitti, New Mexico. She was the co-recipient of the Native American Journalist Association's 2016 Richard LaCourse Award for Investigative Reporting. Denetclaw is currently finishing her degree in multimedia journalism from the University of New Mexico - Main. Denetclaw covers a range of topics including genetic research, education, health, social justice issues and small businesses. She loves coffee, writing and being with her family. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram. Her handle is @pdineclah