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It was a late night Tuesday as lawmakers passed a $100 million expenditure plan for capital outlay projects spanning the entire Navajo Nation.

As candidates begin to campaign for the job of Navajo Nation president, the salary they will get if they win has not changed in the past 30 years.

The executive and legislative branches of the Navajo Nation government spent last week in yet another debate over just how much authority does the president have when he line-item vetoes an appropriation made by the Council.

Tom Chee, who represents Shiprock on the Navajo Nation Council, has thrown his hat in the ring for Navajo Nation president, his son announced Sunday on Facebook.

A bill in Congress seeks to violate the Treaty of 1868. House Resolution 4864, the so-called “No Haven for Dangerous Fugitives Act,” was introduced by U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem, a Republican, from South Dakota.

State Sen. John Pinto, D-McKinley-San Juan, received statewide recognition last week.

Since Attorney General Ethel Branch put a halt to the Twin Arrows Travel Center project over a year ago, the Navajo Nation Council has amended the Navajo Nation Code to prevent this from happening again.

There is a balance of about $31.2 million in the Unreserved, Undesignated Fund and during a Naabik’iyati Committee meeting lawmakers approved about $10.7 million from the UUFB for various projects.

Just six months out from the primary election, only two candidates — Rex Lee Jim and Dineh Benally — have formally announced their intention to run for the Navajo Nation’s highest office.

The Navajo Board of Election Supervisors has agreed to cancel the voting registration of more than 52,000 tribal members who did not vote in the 2014 election for president and the 2016 chapter elections.